Tag: <span>VMware</span>

Speakers: Lee Dilworth, Clive Wenman (VMware)

Understanding the Use Cases and Implementation Options

Prior to SRM 5, relied on array-based replication
– requires same versions of vCenter and SRM but ESX versions can vary
SRM 5 now supports vSphere Replication (in addition to array-based)
– vSphere Replication requires parity of all versions of vSphere

SRM: Site Recovery Manager
SRA: Storage Replication Adapter

SRM 5 UI allows seeing both sites from one interface

vSphere Replication offers a cost-effective choice/alternative to array-based
– does not replace array-based for the foreseeable future

Technology Virtualization

Storage Technology Virtualization

Speaker: Min Cai, Ali Mashtizadeh (VMware)

Agenda:
– Basics of Storage vMotion
– Use Cases
– History of vMotion
– Architectural Overview in vSphere 5
– Snapshots & Storage vMotion
– Linked Virtual Machines
– Future Roadmap

Storage Technology Virtualization

Technology Virtualization

Speaker: Vyenkatesh Deshpande (VMware)

Agenda:
– Overview of VDS
– vSphere 5 New Features
– VDS Best Practices
– VDS Myths

# Overview
– unified network virtualization management in dependent of physical fabric
– manage datacenter-wide switch vs. individual switches per host
– vMotion-aware: statistics and policies follow the VM simplifying debugging and troubleshooting

Networking Technology Virtualization

Speakers: Sanjay Aiyagari (VMware), Simon Hamilton-Wilkes (F5)

Journey of IT Transformation: Accelerate and Amplify
– moving from server consolidation to being able to monitor and manage your applications
– and from there to hosting multiple instances of your application in the cloud provisioned independently for varied users

The Journey: Stage 1 – Infrastructure Focus
+ shared resource pools
+ elastic capacity
– no business continuity

The Journey: Stage 2 – Application Focus
+ zero-touch infrastructure
+ increased control and service assurance
– possible downtime
– idle infrastructures
– infrastructure dependencies

The Journey: Stage 3 – Business Focus
+ service definition
+ self-service
+ chargeback
– isolation between instances
– application configuration updates reflect infrastructure

Networking Technology Virtualization

Technology Virtualization

If you regularly SSH into your ESX hosts, this may be old news to you. But if you’re like me and mostly manage your ESX hosts via vSphere Client, you might have a surprise waiting for you when you upgrade to ESX & ESXi 4.1. With the advent of ESX Active Directory integration, VMware kindly decided to impose some new changes and requirements for local user accounts. What does this mean to you?

For me, it meant that when I tried to SSH into my ESX host, I ran into “Access is denied.” And with only one non-root user account on the system, this meant no remote access (on the host itself). Root is restricted to interactive access, so that wasn’t any help. Thankfully the Dell Remote Access Card (DRAC) put me on the console, so to speak, and let me poke around as root.

The solution, though, came from a Google search, a somewhat unhelpful VMware KB article (1024235), and a little connecting of the dots. AD integration places a new dependency on the local “Administrators” role. If local user accounts aren’t in that role, they can’t get in.

Oddly enough, vSphere Client has to be targeted directly at the ESX host (not vCenter) to edit the role and local users. Looking while connected through vCenter won’t get you anywhere. So, here we go:

Security Technology Virtualization

Are you familiar with VCE? If not, add it to your IT acronym dictionary, but it’ll be something you hear more about in the future if virtualization, shared storage, converged networks, and/or server infrastructure are in your purview. VCE stands for “Virtual Computing Environment” and is a consortium of Cisco, EMC, VMware, and Intel (funny…if you take three of those initials, you get V-C-E). The goal and objective, which they seem to be realizing, is to deliver a “datacenter in a box” (or multiple boxes, if your environment is large), and in a lot of ways, I think they have something going…

The highlights for quick consumption:

  • a VCE Vblock is an encapsulated, manufactured product (SAN, servers, network fully assembled at the VCE factory)
  • a Vblock solution is designed to be sized to your environment based on profiling of 200,000+ virtual environments
  • one of the top VCE marketed advantages is a single support contact and services center for all components (no more finger pointing)
  • because a Vblock follows “recipes” for performance needs and profiles, upgrades also come/require fixed increments
  • Cisco UCS blade increments are in “packs” of four (4) blades; EMC disks come in five (5) RAID group “packs”
  • Vblock-0 is good for 300-800 VMs; Vblock-1 is for 800-3000 VMs; Vblock-2 supports 3000-6000 VMs
  • when crossing the VM threshold for a Vblock size, Vblocks can be aggregated

Those are the general facts. So what does all that mean for interested organizations? Is it a good fit for you? Here are some takeaways I drew from the points above as well as the rest of the briefing by our VCE, EMC, and Cisco reps…

Storage Technology Virtualization

If you’re running a VMware vSphere cluster on a two-tier (or greater) Cisco network, you might be in a situation like I was. You see, we built in redundancy when we planned our core and access switches, but the design had one significant flaw (see the simplified diagram to the right). Pretend all of those lines are redundant paths. Looks good so far, right? If CoreA goes down, ESX(i) can still send traffic up through AccessB to CoreB. The reverse applies if -B is down, and likewise for either of the Access- switches.

The catch comes for VMs on ESX(i) when one of the Core- switches goes down. ESX(i) balances VMs across the ports in the Virtual Machine port group(s). If a port goes down, it will smartly move the VM(s) to another port that is up. If an “upstream” hop like CoreB goes down, though, ESX(i) doesn’t know about that event, so it keeps its VMs in place, oblivious to the fact that the VMs on AccessB ports are as good as dead to the world. [Enter Link-State Tracking]

Networking Technology Virtualization