Tag: <span>3PAR</span>

Earlier this year, we posted about a new SAN bidding process and the eventual winner, the HP 3PAR V400. Now that we’ve been live on it for about six weeks, it’s time for a small update on a particular feature that might weigh in on your own decision, if you’re in the market.

Our new V400 was our first foray into the tiered storage market and we liked what we heard about gaining the speed of SSD storage on hot blocks while not wasting the cost of average data. EMC claimed advanced metrics, granular policies, and the ability to optimize as frequently as every 10 minutes. This sounded REALLY good. 3PAR also cited some of those things, sans the frequency, and we assumed they were about even, granted the results might be slightly delayed on the V400 (vs. VMAXe). What we’ve discovered isn’t so symmetric.

Storage Technology

At the end of the day, it wasn’t the minor technological differences that made the decision for us. Sure, we believed that EMC’s VMAXe was the truly enterprise-class array. The…

Storage Technology

If you’re in the market for a new enterprise-class storage array, both EMC and HP/3PAR have good options for you. Toward the end of 2011, we began evaluating solutions from these two vendors with whom we have history and solid relationships. On the EMC side, we’ve grown up through a CX300 in 2006 and into two CX3-40’s in 2008. At the end of 2008, we deployed a 3PAR T400 at our production site and brought back that CX3-40 to consolidate it with the one at our HQ. It’s been three years hence, and our needs call for new tech.

As is the nature of technology, storage has made leaps and bounds since 2008. What once was unique and elevating to 3PAR–wide striping and simplified provisioning from one big pool of disks–has become common place in arrays of all classes. We used to liken it to replacing the carpet in a room with furniture. It’s a real chore when you have to painstakingly push all the chairs and tables into a corner (or out of the room altogether!) when you want to improve or replace the carpet. With disk abstraction and data-shifting features, though, changes and optimizations can be made without the headaches.

Storage Technology